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What is the emergency Broadcast system test for?

What is the emergency Broadcast system test for?

“The test is intended to ensure public safety officials have the methods and systems that will deliver urgent alerts and warnings to the public in times of an emergency or disaster,” according to a press release from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is working in coordination with the Federal …

Was there a test of the emergency broadcast system?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, tested both the Emergency Alert System (EAS), which broadcasts an emergency tone and message on televisions and radios, and the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), a newer system that sends emergency notifications to smartphones.

Why does the emergency Broadcast system Sound scary?

Those awful screeches you hear at the beginning of the Emergency Alert System are digitized codes that communicate the type of threat, area (counties) threatened, and how long the threat is in place.

What frequency is the emergency broadcast system?

Emergency broadcasts are unable to be heard on conventional AM/FM receivers. They operate across 7 VHF frequencies ranging between 162.400 MHz and 162.550 MHz.

Why are EAS so creepy?

As has already been mentioned, the EAS is there to get your attention. The long monotone buzz sound is meant to grab your attention, and is done at a pitch and frequency that is designed to keep your attention.

Who controls emergency broadcast system?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the FCC, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service (NWS) work collaboratively to maintain the EAS and Wireless Emergency Alerts, which are the two main components of the national public warning system and enable authorities at all …

Has the emergency Broadcast ever been used?

Although the system was never used for a national emergency, it was activated more than 20,000 times between 1976 and 1996 to broadcast civil emergency messages and warnings of severe weather hazards.

Has the emergency broadcast ever been used?

What is the EAS voice?

Emergency Alert System (EAS) Sample- Western MA, 1999-2000 Old Paul, also known as Perfect Paul, was the first TTS voice to be used by the National Weather Service for EAS and NWR alerts starting in 1999.